North Carolina: EIA found in horses

North Carolina: EIA found in horses

Horses have tested positive for equine infectious anemia, according to officials with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.One horse has been reported in Henderson County for being suspected of having EIA and is waiting for test results from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.Another horse in Surry County has tested positive for EIA, according to officials.Officials say that there is no direct link between the horses but both horses are associated with recent sales of racing horses.The EIA disease was discovered by private veterinary practitioners, NCDA&CS Veterinary Division field staff, the North Carolina Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Raleigh, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “Both facilities are under quarantine, which restricts movement of equine until testing is completed by the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the epidemiological investigation is further along,” said Dr. Catherine Harris, director of Livestock Health Programs. “The remaining equines will be observed and retested in 60 days. We are also monitoring neighboring facilities for the disease.” Officials say that these new and suspected cases of has been the first case since 2017.According to officials, EIA is an incurable disease that is commonly spread by biting flies and ticks or shared through medical equipment between equines, such as horses, mules and donkeys. EIA does not affect people and there is no approved vaccine for EIA in the United States, officials say. There are only a few cases each year in the U.S. but are common in other parts of the world and the U.S. controls the virus by regularly testing before traveling across state lines and/or exhibition. The test for EIA is called the Coggins test, according to officials.Officials advise that equine owners who suspect or are worried about EIA should contact their local veterinarian.Any questions about the EIA or other animal diseases should contact the Veterinary Division at 919-707-3250, according to officials.

Horses have tested positive for equine infectious anemia, according to officials with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.

One horse has been reported in Henderson County for being suspected of having EIA and is waiting for test results from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Another horse in Surry County has tested positive for EIA, according to officials.

Officials say that there is no direct link between the horses but both horses are associated with recent sales of racing horses.

The EIA disease was discovered by private veterinary practitioners, NCDA&CS Veterinary Division field staff, the North Carolina Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Raleigh, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

“Both facilities are under quarantine, which restricts movement of equine until testing is completed by the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the epidemiological investigation is further along,” said Dr. Catherine Harris, director of Livestock Health Programs. “The remaining equines will be observed and retested in 60 days. We are also monitoring neighboring facilities for the disease.”

Officials say that these new and suspected cases of has been the first case since 2017.

According to officials, EIA is an incurable disease that is commonly spread by biting flies and ticks or shared through medical equipment between equines, such as horses, mules and donkeys.

EIA does not affect people and there is no approved vaccine for EIA in the United States, officials say.

There are only a few cases each year in the U.S. but are common in other parts of the world and the U.S. controls the virus by regularly testing before traveling across state lines and/or exhibition.

The test for EIA is called the Coggins test, according to officials.

Officials advise that equine owners who suspect or are worried about EIA should contact their local veterinarian.

Any questions about the EIA or other animal diseases should contact the Veterinary Division at 919-707-3250, according to officials.